Douglas Thmopson - Author and International Journalist


Youssef Nada

Above - Inside The Muslim Brotherhood - Youssef Nada, English Book Cover

Below - Inside The Muslim Brotherhood - Youssef Nada, Arabic Book Cover

Youssef Nada - Arabic Book Cover

 

 



Inside The Muslim Brotherhood - Youssef Nada

This is the authorised biography of Youssef Nada, a
man who knows most of the untold story of more
than half a century of rage and revolution. Through
war, global terrorism and complex international
crises, he was there. On the inside. A true eyewitness
to history, a participant and powerbroker in events
which shaped it.

Youssef Nada would never promise answers, but
would offer possible solutions through the ideas and
philosophy he has lived to all his life as an
ambassador of reason, a peacemaker and as the de
facto foreign minister of the Muslim Brotherhood
group who have a membership of more than one
hundred million worldwide with many millions
holding pivotal positions in America, the UK, and
throughout continental Europe.

He has a hard, clear, lucid, vision; he has insight into
the terror of Lockerbie in Scotland, the ‘rehearsals’
for the September 11 onslaught against America and
the July 7 London bombers, the Iran-Contra affair,
the Beirut kidnapping of Terry Waite, and of deals
and horrors that have touched the lives of individuals
and nations alike.

He has been involved in all aspects of the ‘Arab
Spring’ in Egypt, including the upcoming elections in
which the Muslim Brotherhood will take power.
Youssef Nada was, until now, the hidden mystery at
the heart of the Middle East; the part of the puzzle no
one could place. It was safer. After 9/11 Nada, known
throughout much of the world as a humanitarian,
was branded a global terrorist and listed as such by
America and the UN.

The Muslim Brotherhood (al-Ikhwan al-Muslimeen),
the most controversial, and influential, of all Islamist
‘organisations’ from East to West and back again, has
been at odds with many governments; it is the most
potent Islamist opposition party throughout the
Arab world.

Youssef Nada believes that, as he is known as the
Muslim Brotherhood’s international political foreign
emissary, all the international intelligence agencies
moved against him. Now, he has decided to step
completely out of the shadows and tell the story of
his life.

Youssef Nada, a towering figure within The Muslim
Brotherhood confronts the lies and myths and tells:

  • Why suicide bombers are wrong.
  • Why Muslim women should discard their burkhas and be encouraged to enter politics.
  • How Al Qaeda is a tiny group of crazy people, a phenomenon the West grossly exaggerated.
  • How Muslims, Christians and Jews must learn to live together in peace.
  • How Sharia law has been hi-jacked by extremists.
  • Muslims now travel by jet – not camel. Islam is compatible to the 21st Century – and followers must adapt.
  • Muslims religious scholars have not used their brains since the 12th Century.
  • How ruling Muslim states by inheritance is a betrayal of Islam and Muslims.
  • Palestine and Israel as two states will never work.
 
Please click on the pictures to enlarge.
Youssef Nada at home in Campione d'Italia.
Youssef Nada at home in Campione d'Italia. Youssef Nada in a 2012 portrait.
Youssef Nada as a teenaged srtudent in Alexandria, Egypt With Anwwar Ibrahim and the Malaysian
Youssef Nada as a teenaged srtudent in Alexandria, Egypt.   With Anwwar Ibrahim and the Malaysian opposition leader's family in 1995. In 2012 the two men were discussing the 'Malaysian Spring.'
Youssef Nada's empire as the 'King of Cement' Youssef Nada's empire as the 'King of Cement'
A tiny portion Youssef Nada's empire as the 'King of Cement'
Muslim Brotherhood Supreme Guide Omar Al Telmesamy who gave Nada his first mission. 1975. Youssef with Ebrahim Yazdi In the dairy business
Muslim Brotherhood Supreme Guide Omar Al Telmesamy who gave Nada his first mission. 1975.

Nada jpge: Youssef Nada with the Prime Minister of Tunisia Hamadio Jebali on his right and Rashid Al-Ghannusi and members of the Tunisian team who visited Nada at the conclusion of the QWorld Economic Forum's annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, and called on Villa Nada on.
1986 with Ebrahim Yazdi the then foreign secretary of Iran. In the dairy business.
Douglas Thompson in Tahrir Square during 'Arab Spring.' Douglas Thompson in Tahrir Square during 'Arab Spring.'
Douglas Thompson in Tahrir Square during 'Arab Spring.'
Youssef Nada meeting Indonesian President B.J. Habibie at his offices in Jakarata Youssef Nada at a photo session for his biopgraphy.
Youssef Nada meeting Indonesian President B.J. Habibie at his offices in Jakarata.   Youssef Nada at a photo session for his biopgraphy.
Douglas Thompson with Nafil Al Mansouri Douglas Thompson with Nafil Al Mansouri
Douglas Thompson with Nafil Al Mansouri
Youssef Nada and Swiss legal champion As the Ayatollah KLhomeini looks on, Youssef Nada points out to Mohsen Rafighdoost, Minister of Iran's Revolutionary Guard, plans for a satellite city near Tehran.
Youssef Nada and Swiss legal champion and member of the Council of Europe, Dick Marty, flankl Prime Minister Recep Tayyab Erdogan of Turkey.   As the Ayatollah KLhomeini looks on, Youssef Nada points out to Mohsen Rafighdoost, Minister of Iran's Revolutionary Guard, plans for a satellite city near Tehran KLhomeini should be Khomeini...
Douglas Thompson with the former Supreme Guide Youssef Nada and Saddam Hussein
Douglas Thompson with the former Supreme Guide or the Muslim Brotherhood, Mahdi Akef, at their Cairo headquarters in 2012.   Saddam Hussein's guards captured this photograph of Youssef Nada in Septermber,1990, before a long discussion in which Nada attempted to persuade the dictator to withdraw from war.
Rashid Al-Ghannusi the founder and head pof Al Nahda Party in Tunisia, the 'kingmaker' of 2012 Tunisian Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali
Rashid Al-Ghannusi the founder and head pof Al Nahda Party in Tunisia, the 'kingmaker' of 2012 Tunisian Prime Minister Hamadi Jebali.   Youssef Nada with the Prime Minister of Tunisia Hamadio Jebali on his right and Rashid Al-Ghannusi and members of the Tunisian team who visited Nada at the conclusion of the QWorld Economic Forum's annual meeting in Davos, Switzerland, and called on Villa Nada on.
Youssef Nada and Dick Marty at Nada's home overlooking Lake Lugano.   Youssef Nada stands behind (right to left, seated) Muslim Brotherhood pioneer Ahmed Helmi Abdul Magid, Mustafa Mashour, ther fifth Supreme Guiode of the Muslim Brotherhood, and Dr Youssef Al-Qaradawi the eminent scholar.
 
Youssef Nada at 'The Mosque in Munich' which was to prove controversial in the investigations and reportage following 9/11  
Youssef Nada with Giandomenico Picco the former chief United Nations hostage negotiator who won the release of British victims Terry Waite and Terry Anderson among many others.

The Court of Human Rights, Strasbourg, 2011: Douglas Thompson with (from left to right) Mr and Mrs Nada, lawyer Jeremy McBride and Nada's longtime associate Ghaleb Himmat. More than a year later on September 12, 2012, the court ruled. On the day Nada triumphed and in doing so once again change the law of the world. No one leaped to their feet and punched the air at the judgement; it wasn’t that sort of affair. Yet, there was clear applause in the hearts and minds of the human rights observers who attended the court. For it was another great step in the ongoing struggle to rectify the effects of the blind blacklisting following the 9/11 attacks.
  The European Court of Human Rights ruled Switzerland had violated articles of the European Convention on Human Rights and Fundamental Freedoms -- The Convention. It said Switzerland ignored Nada’s human rights by restricting his cross-border movements after America blacklisted him on suspicion of financing terrorism including the 9/11 outrage; it had put him on a sanction list (UN SC 1267) for‘associates’ of Al Qaeda and the Taliban.

The court noted that America had refused to provide evidence to support the accusation, claiming the information was classified. Still, the terror-blacklisting left Nada in a position of being treated as a criminal, without trial, nor with any means of appeal.

European Court of Human Rights gave this verdict: ‘Switzerland should have taken all possible measures, within the latitude available to it, to adapt the sanctions regime to the applicant’s individual situation’.

The ruling continued:

FOR THESE REASONS, THE COURT UNANIMOUSLY

1. Dismissesthe Government’s preliminary objections that the application is incompatible ratione personae with the Convention and that the applicant lacks victim status;

2. Joins to the merits the Government’s preliminary objection that the application is incompatible ratione materiae with the Convention;

3. Dismisses the Government’s preliminary objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies in respect of the complaints under Articles 5 and 8, and joins this objection to the merits in respect of the Article 13 complaint;

4. Declares the complaints concerning Articles 8 and 13 admissible and the remainder of the application inadmissible;

5. Dismisses the Government’s preliminary objection that the application is incompatible ratione materiae with the Convention and holds that there has been a violation of Article 8 of the Convention;

6. Dismisses the Government’s preliminary objection of non-exhaustion of domestic remedies in respect of the Article 13 complaint and holds that there has been a violation of Article 13 of the Convention in conjunction with Article 8;

7. Holds

(a) that the respondent State is to pay the applicant, within three months, the sum of EUR 30,000 (thirty thousand euros), plus any tax that may be chargeable to the applicant on that sum, in respect of costs and expenses, to be converted into the currency of the respondent State at the rate applicable at the date of settlement;

(b) that from the expiry of the above-mentioned three months until settlement simple interest shall be payable on the above amount at a rate equal to the marginal lending rate of the European Central Bank during the default period plus three percentage points;

8. Dismisses the remainder of the applicant’s claim for just satisfaction.

Done in English and French, and delivered at a public hearing in the Human Rights Building, Strasbourg, on 12 September 2012.

*The full ruling is available online at http://hudoc.echr.coe.int